madlori:

oh-deir:

ACTUAL MESSAGE OF (500) DAYS OF SUMMER THAT NO ONE ACTUALLY REALIZES

JGL has just about talked himself hoarse explaining this.

The relationship model in the film isn’t him, it’s Gubler’s character, who when asked about his dream girl, says a few things he might wish for, but then goes on to say that his actual girlfriend is better than his dream girl, because she’s a real person.

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19 hours ago with 797867 notes via madlori
#excellent#films

tamorapierce:

doctorscienceknowsfandom:

anatsuno:

navalenigma:

shayvaalski:

friendlycloud:

agewa:

“We went to Kineshma, that’s in Ivanovo region, to visit his parents. I went as a heroine and I never expected someone to welcome me, a front-line girl, like that. We’ve gone through so much, we’ve saved lives, lifes of mothers, wives. And then… I heard accusations, I was bad-mouthed. Before that I’ve only ever been “dear sister”… We had tea and my husband’s mother took him aside and started crying: “Who did you marry? A front-line girl… You have two younger sisters. Who’s going to marry them now?” When I think back to that moment I feel tears welling up. Imagine: I had a record, I loved it a lot. There was a song, it said: you have the right to wear the best shoes. That was about a front-line girl. I had it playing, and [his?] elder sister came up and broke it apart, saying: you have no rights. They destroyed all my photos from the war… We, front-line girls, went through so much during hte war… and then we had another war. Another terrible war. The men left us, they didn’t cover our backs. Not like at the front.” from С.Алексеевич “У войны не женское лицо”

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn. 

This has always happened in history: Women do something important. Then they get shamed for it (so nobody will talk about it) and it gets erased from history.

And then certain men will say: “Women suck, they’ve never done anything important.”

Look into history and learn that women have played a far greater role then douches (present and past) wanted you to know.

Hey Will (and Jack) I got you something.

So this is important. Let me tell you a story.

All the time I spend debating about women in combat, I’ve picked up on a trend that disturbs me. Supporting or attacking, people are quick to draw on biology, psychology, law, but very rarely - almost never - do I hear about the history of women in combat, and the evidence their service lends to this debate.

Hundreds of thousands of women faced combat in WW2, and on both sides, and on all fronts, and it is a history that has been almost completely erased from contemporary awareness. I have been given arguments about how women can not psychologically handle combat. And about how women in mixed-gender combat units will automatically disrupt group cohesion - the brotherhood, if you will. Both of these assertions are erasure.

Women have not lived in a protective bubble untouched by combat for all of history. Women have been killed, wounded, and captured in combat, and tortured after. We are not living a world where these are hypothetical situations women have yet to prove they can handle. Unfortunately, they have, they can, in the future, they probably will, again and again. Soviet women served as partisans, snipers, tank drivers, fighter pilots, bombers. And more.

Both British and American women served in mixed-gender AA units. I could drag you through several examples of British women performing exemplarily despite being wounded, or seeing their comrades die. The Luftwaffe did not discriminate. Between the British and the Americans, it was determined that mixed gender units actually performed much better than all male units, because of teamwork. Because women are better and certain tasks, men are better at certain tasks, and at other tasks they are comparably efficient, and in a team, hopefully, in combat, you let the best do what they are best at. For the most part, they were proud to serve together. 

German propaganda never commented on the British AA units, but they thoroughly smeared the Soviet fighting woman - flitenweiber. People often argue with me that women are a threat to group cohesion because men naturally give women preferential treatment. Which certainly explains why men are more likely to survive shipwrecks. And history shows us that Germans soldiers had no chivalrous compunction when it came to shooting captured Soviet women who were armed.

We’re fed a history of war that almost exclusively features white male figures, most of whom fit into this destructive constructed myth of the soldier that is somehow both chivalrous and charmingly womanizing and who’s sense of brotherhood is unshakably dependent on the band being all man. There is no history of woman at war, none. I hear a lot about how women have no upper body strength, I hear nothing about the Front-Line Female Comrade.

THE WORD FRONTOVICHKA BECAME A TERRIBLE INSULT - are you fucking kidding me? Fuck, that made me cry. At first when I started reading I thought I was reading alernate history fiction. I’m ashamed to be ignorant about this, and full of rage and much worse bitter shame that this history is constantly repressed, suppressed, hidden. WHAT THE FUCK. D: D: D:

I didn’t know that bit about the AA (Anti-Aircraft) units.

And even in this article I don’t see a mention of the women of the Israeli Army, or women of the resistance if we’re just sticking to WWII.  I didn’t know about the Russian soldiers, only the fighter pilots, the night witches, and I’ve spent years poking into the corners of history trying to find women who will serve as ammunition when men tell me women can’t fight. 

The best explanation I’ve heard of what happened to women after WWII comes from “A League of Their Own,” the publicist’s character: “What is this—the war is over, Rosie, turn in your rivets?”  Women all over the world had to step into the same old ruts.

I don’t think it’s any mistake at all that Betty Friedan wrote her ground-breaking text for the second wave of feminism, THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, just 10 years after WWII, after women had dined on a full plate of the same old, same old.

And shame on the men who never stood up for the women who worked and fought beside them, and saved their lives.

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19 hours ago with 47408 notes via siterlas (source)
#ladies#history

sashayed:

Lourdes Gerrard in EVERY FOOTBALL KIT EVER 

SORRY I have more to say about this. Put this in your mind grapes: Steven Gerrard, age 57 — looking, lbr, probably exactly the same — finally wins the World Cup trophy he could never get as a player: as COACH of the ENGLAND WOMEN’S TEAM, with Lourdes as the triumphant and well-coiffed Michael Bradley to his Bill (but both better at their jobs). 

"COACH STEVIE G" USES HIS HIGH PROFILE AND THE RESPECT HE STILL COMMANDS IN THE GAME TO HELP CEMENT WOMEN’S FOOTBALL AS A HUGE THING, AT LEAST AS SUCCESSFUL AND LUCRATIVE AS THE DUDE VERSION. Burly men make up drinking songs* about their favorite lady players, paint their names on their chests, get into loud arguments at pubs about whether Alba Bale or lil Abby Wambach Jr. is the best player in the world. LOURDES, A FASHIONABLE WUNDERKIND QUEEN AND BELOVED CAPTAIN, GETS CRAZY BECKHAM MONEY TO BE IN STUPID COWBOY-THEMED ADS FOR LUCOZADE and possibly marries AN ALONSO CHILD. LOURDES PROUDLY HANDING THE WORLD CUP TO "COACH DAD" TO LIFT. STEVIE SHEDDING A SINGLE MANLY TEAR AS SHE KISSES HIM ON THE CHEEK, PICTURE ON THE FRONT PAGE OF EVERY NEWSPAPER IN THE WORLD. COACH STEVIE BEING TOSSED UP IN THE AIR BY A CHEERING MOB OF GURL ATHLETES. See you guys in the FUTURE, it’s gonna be AWESOME.

*the songs, just like those written for their dude counterparts, are occasionally sexual but always essentially respectful/affectionate.

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19 hours ago with 821 notes via sashayed (source)
#i hardly care about football#but this#THIS#i am welling up#let this be a thing that happens

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      

NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

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19 hours ago with 11674 notes via sashayed (source)
#ladies#you could cause a small riot

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

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19 hours ago with 62008 notes via sashayed (source)
#long post#art#excellent

Chris Pratt interrupts the interview to french braid intern’s hair x

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19 hours ago with 59625 notes via sashayed (source)
#chris pratt#the dream

archiemcphee:

We’ve seen a marble sweatsuit and marble sculptures that appear to be made of crumbly styrofoam, now please marvel along with us at these lovely lightweight, airy dresses on hangers waiting to be worn. Only they won’t be worn by anyone because they’ve been painstakingly carved from Carrera Marble by Edinburgh, Scotland-based sculptor Alasdair Thomson for a series entitled The Identity Collection. Each piece is based on a garment donated to Thomson by a friend or family member.

Visit Alasdair’s website and Instagram account to check out more of his awesome sculptures.

[via Colossal and Beautiful/Decay]

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19 hours ago with 666 notes via sashayed (source)
#art#sculpture#HOLY SHIT#i cannot get over sculpting#like how does one do that#how do ou make hard stone feel soft and light and yielding#what is this sorcery

9thspace:

"Swimming Pool" Series by Franck Bohbot

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21 hours ago with 5903 notes via earhat (source)
#photography#art#i have gotten absolutely obsessed with the swimming at the commonwealth games#all the water

nevver:

Walk this way, Caïssa SOLO

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21 hours ago with 786 notes via siterlas (source)
#art

parkkennypark:

Freckles.

Sometimes that’s all the accessory you need.

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1 week ago with 666 notes via shylocks (source)
#art